BEAUTY WORLDS: GLOBAL BEAUTY NEWS
News stories from around the world about beauty in cultures


Saturday, June 05, 2004  

Digital Chosunilbo (English Edition) : Daily News in English About Korea:Catch a Glimpse of Russian Beauty While You Eat?


 

Tiny beauty shop in Kuwait fills big void for troops




Friday, June 04, 2004  

ASPS Survey Reveals Dramatic Increase In People Seeking Plastic Surgery After Massive Weight Loss
ASPS Survey Reveals Dramatic Increase In People Seeking Plastic Surgery After Massive Weight Loss
For Immediate Release: June 3, 2004

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. — Ninety-four percent of plastic surgeons responding to a survey by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) report that in the past five years the number of people seeking body contouring plastic surgery procedures following massive weight loss (MWL) has dramatically increased in their practices.

More than 52,000 body contouring procedures following massive weight loss were performed in 2003, and an increase of 36 percent is projected in 2004. According to a proprietary ASPS survey, plastic surgeons are being inundated with patients seeking these procedures. ASPS members report the demand is also driving growth in other areas of their cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery practices.

Survey Highlights

94 percent of responding ASPS members say the number of patients seeking surgery following massive weight loss (MWL) has grown exponentially in the last five years.

79 percent of responding ASPS members currently perform body contouring procedures following MWL.

85 percent of responding ASPS members see one to two MWL patients each week.

77 percent perform surgery on MWL patients each month.

The majority, 59 percent of responding ASPS surgeons, have developed a collaborative relationship with bariatric surgeons.

Body contouring surgery is not performed immediately after bariatric surgery. Eighty percent of members surveyed perform plastic surgery between 12 and 18 months after bariatric surgery.

The three most common surgical procedures performed are abdominoplasty, breast surgery and brachioplasty (upper arms). These are followed closely by middle thigh lift and, to a lesser degree, facial rejuvenation.

As the demand for plastic surgery following massive weight loss continues to grow, refined techniques and new technologies will continue to be developed. ASPS members strongly support ongoing education and information as a means to further improve patient outcomes. For the latest information on this and other cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery procedures, visit the ASPS Web site at www.plasticsurgery.org.

For referrals to plastic surgeons certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and to learn more about cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery, call ASPS at 888-4-PLASTIC (888-475-2784) or visit www.plasticsurgery.org.

ASPS is the largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons in the world and the foremost authority on cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. With nearly 5,000 members, more than any other plastic surgery organization, ASPS is the definitive voice of the plastic surgery specialty. Viewed throughout the world as the pinnacle of information for new techniques, advances and plastic surgery trends, the society represents 94 percent of all the board-certified plastic surgeons in the U.S. Ninety-four percent of all ASPS members perform cosmetic plastic surgery and 89 percent of all ASPS members perform reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS, founded in 1931, represents physicians certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

CONTACT:
Media Relations
(847) 228-9900
media@plasticsurgery.org
REPORTERS:
Journalists can register with the ASPS for the latest plastic surgery news, information and mailings.


 

Breastfeeding: beauty or the breast In Tanzania some women are reluctant to breast-feed their babies because they worry that it will negatively effect the beauty of their shape as they believe the breasts lose their firmness and sag after breast-feeding. They also worry that breast-feeding women are unattractive to their husbands.


 

Beauty contest for men - JUNE 4, 2004 China is to hold a beauty contest for men with titles including Mr Honest, Mr Wisdom and Mr Welfare.




Tuesday, June 01, 2004  

BBC NEWS | UK | Beauty spas 'can aid countryside' A boom in rural beauty spas could provide an economic boost to the English countryside as the sector continues to expand by 11% a year.




Monday, May 31, 2004  

Prosperous Chinese head here for plastic surgery The new rich in China apparently have considerable faith in the cosmetic surgery skills of the Koreans and many are heading there to have their eyelids and other parts of themselves done in the quest for beauty.


 

BBC NEWS | UK | Audrey Hepburn tops beauty poll




Sunday, May 30, 2004  

Maxillofacial surgeons bring unique set of skills to elective cosmetic surgery



From the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons
September 2003

For Immediate Release Contact:
Marquita Hynes or Janice K. Teplitz
Ph: 847/678-6200 Fax: 847/678-6286



Maxillofacial surgeons bring unique set of skills to elective cosmetic surgery


A growing number of oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMSs) are taking their training and experience in facial trauma and reconstruction into the elective cosmetic realm as age-conscious Baby Boomers seek remedies for their drooping eyelids and developing jowls, according to surgeons who will speak at the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) 85th annual meeting, September 10-13, in Orlando, Fla.

“Cosmetic surgery now represents about 10 to 20 percent of our specialty, and that percentage will increase as Baby Boomers continues to age and the demand for cosmetic surgery continues to grow,” says Jerry L. Jones, D.D.S., M.D., an Albuquerque, NM, oral and maxillofacial surgeon and an associate attending physician in the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Jones will moderate a symposium on soft tissue cosmetic procedures at the AAOMS meeting.

The escalating demand for cosmetic services in the United States is fueling a growth in the number of cosmetic surgery fellowships offered to OMSs and other specialists through such organizations as the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery, he says.

In addition, Dr. Jones believes the increase in OMS involvement in facial cosmetic work reflects a broader overlapping of anatomic boundaries among the various medical and dental specialties over the past 10 to 15 years.

Their unique combination of dental and surgical training provides OMSs with a natural affinity for cosmetic reconstructive surgery. OMSs are the leading experts in orthognathic surgery, the surgical repositioning of the upper and lower jaws to achieve facial balance and other functional problems, such as breathing and chewing. They are often the first surgeons called into the hospital emergency room to assist in cases involving facial trauma.

Although orthognathic surgery still represents a significant portion of what OMSs do, “OMSs have become more soft tissue-conscious in recent years, while plastic surgeons have become more bone-conscious,” Dr. Jones says.

“The anatomic definitions of the specialties are no longer as rigid as they once were. That is a good thing, because traditional anatomic boundaries are not what matter most. What matters are training, experience and competency,” he says.

As the first on-call specialists in emergency rooms for patients with facial trauma and as experts in the surgical correction of congenital facial deformities, OMSs have a deep understanding of facial structure and harmony. Their knowledge and experience prepare them very well for the facial cosmetic arena, Dr. Jones says.

It was an OMS, in fact, who pioneered one of the most important recent advances in facial cosmetic surgery, Dr. Jones notes. The technique, known as the four-dimensional facelift, represents a significant improvement over conventional surgical procedures, which primarily lift and tighten the skin from the outside.

Developed by Stephen Watson, D.D.S., M.D, of Plano, Tex, who will speak at the symposium, the four-dimensional facelift repositions and lifts all four layers of facial tissue, producing more attractive, natural and enduring results. The surgeon manipulates the skin, the subcutaneous layer (tissue immediately under the skin surface), the facial muscles, and the periosteum, the membrane of nerve- and blood-rich tissue covering the bones. Laser skin resurfacing can be performed at the same time to reduce wrinkling.

Other key advances in soft-tissue cosmetic surgery to be highlighted at the symposium include the use of endoscopy, which allows surgeons to see and manipulate the facial soft tissues by entering through small incisions near the hairline.

Conventional techniques involve the manipulation of tissue just under the skin. Endoscopy allows the surgeon to go deeper and to manipulate and tighten facial tissue by elevating tissue off of the bone, producing a younger, fresher appearance.

The surgeon places a small, wand-like instrument called an endoscope through an inch-long incision. A tiny camera in the scope sends a real-time image to a video monitor. Using the video display as a guide, the surgeon inserts small instruments through the other incisions to lift and reposition tissue to achieve the desired results.

This less invasive approach preserves more facial blood supply than conventional techniques involving larger incisions; reduces scarring, bruising and postoperative pain; speeds healing; and produces more natural, lasting results.

In addition to four years of postgraduate dental education, OMSs complete a minimum four-year hospital-based surgical residency, rotating through other services, including internal medicine, anesthesiology, general and plastic surgery, and emergency medicine.

“Our dental, medical and surgical training allow us to approach facial cosmetic surgery from the bone up, and our experience in the treatment of trauma and congenital deformities gives us a solid grounding in the surgical improvement of facial appearance,” Dr. Jones says. “So much of what OMSs have done traditionally has focused on making faces look better. Our expanding involvement in elective cosmetic procedures is a natural progression.”


#


The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS), the professional organization representing more than 7,000 oral and maxillofacial surgeons in the United States, supports its members’ ability to practice their specialty through education, research, and advocacy. AAOMS members comply with rigorous continuing education requirements and submit to periodic office examinations, ensuring the public that all office procedures and personnel meet stringent national standards.


##


Note: Prior to September 9, 2003, editors and reporters interested in attending the AAOMS annual meeting or scheduling interviews with oral and maxillofacial surgeons should contact AAOMS’s Senior Communications Associate Marquita Hynes at 847/678-6200; mhynes@aaoms.org. From September 9-13, Marquita can be reached in Orlando, Fla, during the association’s annual meeting, at 407/685-4032; mhynes@aaoms.org.


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New Survey Reveals Dramatic Rise in “Aging Face” Surgical Procedures Including Facelifts


New Survey Reveals Dramatic Rise in “Aging Face” Surgical Procedures Including Facelifts

Survey also finds a Rising Trend in Non-Surgical Procedures in Patients under Forty

NEW YORK – Baby boomers do not seem to be content to grow old gracefully according to a new survey by the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS). Rhytidectomy surgeries (facelifts) have increased almost by 50 percent in the United States, a trend which shows more Americans are continuing to have invasive cosmetic facial plastic surgeries. On the younger end of the spectrum, the AAFPRS membership survey also pointed to a growing trend of patients forty years old and younger who are seeking to improve or enhance their appearance by non-invasive procedures.

“A significant trend highlighted from this survey shows the high increase in facelifts – which could be attributed to the fact that a baby boomer turns 50 years old every eight seconds. In addition, last year we saw more women, especially women under forty, flocking to facial plastic surgeons for many non-surgical procedures ranging from filler injections to chemical peels,” says Dr. Keith LaFerriere, president of the AAFPRS. “It appears that the growing popularity of cosmetic surgery has been heightened due to the increased media exposure it has garnered on primetime television, including programs like ABC’s “Extreme Makeover.”

The findings indicate in 2003 that rhytidectomies have increased by an overwhelming total of 46 percent compared to 2002, with an increase of 45 percent seen in women and 12 percent in men. Even more surprising, is the increase in non-invasive procedures seen in patients under forty (39 – 20 years old). Botox injections increased by 133 percent compared to 2002 in the under forty category. Patients (men and women) in the under forty age bracket increased their chemical peel procedures by 369 percent from last year.

“The public is consistently reminded of cosmetic procedures and the options available to people of all ages, which has resulted in an increased public acceptance of cosmetic surgery; both women and men are now more open to admitting they underwent facial plastic surgery,” added LaFerriere.

There is a growing availability of procedures including different facial filler options. Overall, filler injections are up 39 percent, fat injections are up 191 percent, 354 percent in women alone, and Botox injections are up 44 percent in 2003. With the recent FDA approval of Restylane in 2004, the AAFPRS forecasts an even greater percentage increase in cosmetic fillers in next years survey findings.

According to the survey the filler phenomenon has doctors offices crowded with patients eagerly waiting to pay an average of $1620.00 for fat injections, $547.00 for filler injections and $443.00 for Botox injections.

In 2003, the most popular cosmetic surgical procedures included scar revisions, up an astonishing 142 percent. Otoplasty (surgery of the ear where protruding or deformed ears can be “pinned back” by reshaping the cartilage) was up 94 percent while forehead lifts were up 53 percent. In addition, cosmetic non-surgical procedures saw significant increases as well; laser resurfacing increased by 171 percent and microdermabrasion was up 90 percent overall according to the survey.

Women continue to be the most likely candidates for facial plastic surgery with 71 percent of all surgical procedures and 87 percent of all non-surgical procedures. Specific increases among women in 2003 are seen with IPL (Intense Pulse Light) treatments, up 339 percent, facial/neck liposuction, up 189 percent among women, microdermabrasion up 97 percent, otoplasty, up 73 percent and forehead lifts are up 68 percent.

The AAFPRS survey also pointed out the difference between men and women. The top procedures among men were facial/neck liposuction up 66 percent, microdermabrasion, up 45 percent and laser resurfacing, up 30 percent. About half of all patients, male and female, have had multiple procedures in the same year. The AAFPRS survey also notes that in 2003, of African Americans who have had facial cosmetic surgery, most received rhinoplasty (42 percent). Asian Americans who have had facial cosmetic surgery were most likely to have received blepharoplasty (32 percent).

Not surprising, nearly half of the patients (49 percent of women and 39 percent of men) tell their surgeons that looking younger is the reason for wanting to undergo facial plastic cosmetic surgery. The survey showed men are more likely than women (31 percent versus 18 percent respectively) to say they want facial plastic surgery for work-related reasons.

Dr. LaFerriere reminds patients to make informed decisions when it comes to undergoing facial plastic surgery procedures. “Whether undergoing a surgical operation, such as a facelift, or a non-surgical procedure like Botox injections, patients need to be mindful that these are all medical procedures that should be performed by the hands of a well-trained, qualified, and experienced facial plastic surgeon.”

The AAFPRS urges patients to make an educated choice when selecting a surgeon if he or she is considering facial plastic surgery. A surgeon should be board certified by boards affiliated with the American Board of Medical Specialists (ABMS) or equivalent boards like the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Many AAFPRS members are certified by the American Board of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery – a board recognized by the ABMS, which certifies surgeons in facial plastic surgery.

Board certified members of the AAFPRS completed the 2003 survey questionnaire. The survey was conducted by International Communications Research in Media, PA. A full listing of the AAFPRS membership survey can be found at www.FACEMD.org.

The AAFPRS is the world’s largest association of facial plastic and reconstructive surgeons with more than 2,600 members – whose cosmetic reconstructive surgery focuses on the face, head and neck. Academy fellows are board-certified and subscribe to a code of ethics. In addition, the AAFPRS provides consumers with free information and brochures and a list of qualified facial plastic surgeons in their area by calling 1-800-332-FACE or by visiting the AAFPRS Web site, www.FACEMD.org.



 

Nonsurgical Does Not Mean Non-Medical
Nonsurgical Does Not Mean Non-Medical January 3, 2000


New York, NY (May 19, 2004) — The increasing popularity of nonsurgicall cosmetic procedures has led to a growing complacency about where procedures are being performed and by whom, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS). It is the ASAPS position that ancillary procedures, such as skin resurfacing or Botox injections, while not surgical, are medical procedures and should only be done in appropriate facilities under the supervision of a qualified physician who has been trained in the particular procedure.

Medical History: Before any medical procedure is undertaken, a medical history should be provided in order to determine appropriateness. This is especially important to avoid allergic reactions and to identify underlying medical conditions that might pose risks.


Alternative Treatments: One purpose of pre-treatment consultation is the thorough evaluation of each patient and the exploration of alternatives, including no treatment.


Informed Consent: A discussion of the benefits and risks of any medical procedure is required for full informed consent. nonsurgical procedures do not always result in less "downtime." A plastic surgeon can explain the pros and cons of various treatments.


Appropriate Setting: Medical procedures require sanitary surroundings and sterile instruments, as well as authentic equipment and medications. Parties and group events may compromise results.


Emergency Plans: Nonsurgical procedures may occasionally result in unforeseen consequences. Plans should be in place to handle these.


Follow-up Care: Follow-up care is an important part of the doctor-patient relationship and is necessary to assure optimum procedure results.
It is ASAPS' position that all medical procedures - surgical and nonsurgical - should be done under the care of properly credentialed and trained medical professionals.

The following is a representative list of ancillary (nonsurgical) medical procedures:

Chemical skin peels, including:
Alpha Hydroxy Acid (AHA)

Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA)

Phenol

Injectable treatments, including:
Botox

Collagen (Human and Bovine)

Fat

Hyaluronic acid (Restylane and Hylaform)

Calcium hydroxylapatite (Radiance)

Sclerotherapy (treatment of leg veins)

Laser hair removal

Laser treatment of leg veins

Skin resurfacing, including:

Ablative Lasers (Carbon Dioxide, Erbium)

Nonablative Lasers (N-Lite, Cool Touch and others)

Intense Pulsed Light

Dermabrasion

Microdermabrasion
This document was updated from November 13, 2002.


The 2200-member American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) is the only plastic surgery organization devoted entirely to the advancement of cosmetic surgery. ASAPS is recognized throughout the world as the authoritative source for cosmetic surgery education. U.S. members are certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery. Canadian members are certified in plastic surgery by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.
Toll-free referral line: 888.ASAPS.11 (272.7711). Web site: www.surgery.org



 

Upper Arm Reduction — Refined Techniques, Satisfying Results
Upper Arm Reduction — Refined Techniques, Satisfying Results January 3, 2000



NEW YORK, NY (May 20, 2004) — Upper arm fat, flabbiness or loose, hanging skin are common problems that cause embarrassment and lead some people to avoid wearing sleeveless clothing even on the hottest days of summer. Today, however, an increasing number of women and men are choosing to undergo cosmetic plastic surgery to reduce and recontour their upper arms. More than 10,500 upper arm reductions, technically called brachioplasty, were performed last year, which is an increase of 321 percent since1997, according to statistics from the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS).

"In the past, aesthetic plastic surgeons would often discourage patients from undergoing upper arm reduction," says plastic surgeon Jose Guerrerosantos, MD, an ASAPS International Member in Guadalajara, Mexico, whose article on brachioplasty techniques appears in the current issue of Aesthetic Surgery Journal , ASAPS' peer-reviewed clinical journal of cosmetic surgery. "As aesthetic surgeons, our goal is always to provide a result in which the surgery itself is as undetectable as possible. Upper arm reduction often requires a visible incision. But we have gotten better at placing the incision so that it is relatively inconspicuous, causing the least possible concern to patients."

Some patients, generally those with excess upper arm fat but good skin tone, can achieve contour improvement with liposuction alone, requiring only tiny incisions. However, for patients requiring more extensive surgery, the brachioplasty incision usually begins in the armpit area, called the axilla, and runs along the underside of the upper arm. According to Dr. Guerrerosantos, the length of the incision may vary, depending on the severity of the contour problem. In all cases, the goal is to place the incision so it is not visible with the arms in their normal resting position.

A number of factors, some interrelated, may contribute to sagging of the upper arm tissues. These factors include heredity, aging, fat accumulation, hormonal changes and significant weight loss. "The dramatic increase in the number of brachioplasties being performed may reflect the general upward demand for body contouring procedures in post-bariatric surgery patients who have lost a hundred pounds or more," says plastic surgeon Charles Hughes, MD, of Indianapolis, IN, chair of the ASAPS Body Contouring Committee. "Frequently, massive weight loss patients seeking contouring of multiple body areas will say, 'fix my arms first' -- it's that much of a focal point for them."

Upper arm reduction is a procedure that requires a great deal of surgical skill. In removing excess fat and skin, it is important to protect the delicate structures of the upper arm, including the veins and superficial nerves. To help achieve optimal results, patients may be instructed to wear pressure dressings for an extended period after surgery, especially at night. Patients also may be advised to avoid physical exercise for at least one month after brachioplasty.

"Like all plastic surgery, brachioplasty should be undertaken only by a trained surgeon with significant experience in this type of operation," says ASAPS President Peter Fodor, MD, of Los Angeles. "Patients considering upper arm reduction should consult with a board-certified plastic surgeon who is a member of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. In addition, patients must clearly understand that, in this procedure, the tradeoff for a more aesthetic upper arm contour is a scar that may be relatively long and, in certain arm positions, visible."

Dr. Guerrerosantos agrees that patient education about the procedure is extremely important, adding that patients are overwhelmingly pleased with the elimination of unattractive flabbiness and hanging skin in their upper arms. "Using refined techniques for this operation helps to improve the final appearance of scars," he says. "Brachioplasty is a safe and effective procedure that can produce a high level of patient satisfaction."


The 2200-member American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) is the only plastic surgery organization devoted entirely to the advancement of cosmetic surgery. ASAPS is recognized throughout the world as the authoritative source for cosmetic surgery education. U.S. members are certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery. Canadian members are certified in plastic surgery by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.
Toll-free referral line: 888.ASAPS.11 (272.7711). Web site: www.surgery.org


 

Scope of Training vs Scope of Practice

NEW YORK, NY (May 20, 2004) – The growing demand for cosmetic procedures, as well as the attraction of self-pay elective surgery in an era of managed care, has encouraged physicians from various specialty-training backgrounds to assume the mantle of “cosmetic surgeon.” Accredited hospitals require surgeons to be certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery for the performance of many types of cosmetic procedures; however, any state-licensed medical doctor (MD), even without formal surgical training or certification, can legally perform the same types of procedures in an unaccredited surgicenter or office-based surgical facility. Recent legislation in more than a dozen states permitting dentists to perform cosmetic surgical procedures has created an even more confusing and alarming situation for patients. The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS), the leading professional organization dedicated to cosmetic plastic surgery education, is committed to informing the public about the specialized training of board-certified plastic surgeons and how this training differentiates plastic surgeons from others, both physicians and non-physicians , who perform cosmetic procedures.

“The issue of untrained or inadequately trained practitioners, some of whom are not medical doctors, performing cosmetic plastic surgery is an extremely serious patient safety concern,” says Los Angeles plastic surgeon and ASAPS President Peter B. Fodor, MD. “ For ultimate patient safety it is essential that our legislators and the general public be better educated about what constitutes appropriate training to perform operations such as facelifts, rhinoplasty and cosmetic eyelid surgery, as well as plastic surgery of the breasts and body, including liposuction.”

ASAPS has an ongoing program to inform the public about the training and certification of plastic surgeons. However, the complexity of the credentialing process and the confusing array of certifying boards, many of which are created independently and not recognized by the medical establishment, can be difficult to understand -- even for the educated consumer.

Patients should familiarize themselves with the education, training, board-certification and experience of any medical professional who will be performing their procedure. At a minimum, patients should confirm that the doctor has surgical privileges to perform the same procedure in an accredited hospital -- even if the doctor operates in an outpatient or office-based facility.

Scope of Training: Plastic Surgeons and Oral Surgeons

Aggressive lobbying by dental practitioners in a number of key states has recently led to legislative recognition of an increased scope of practice for dentists and oral surgeons. “This is particularly unexpected in light of the current nationwide focus on patient safety,” says Dr. Fodor. “The training of the individual performing a surgical procedure is a critical factor in the overall safety of the surgery.”

Plastic surgeons, after completing college, spend four years in medical school and a minimum of five additional years in surgical training. The demanding residency program that all plastic surgeons must complete before they can be considered for certification by the American Board of Plastic Surgery (ABPS) ensures that they not only acquire general surgical knowledge and experience but, additionally, that they master the principles and practice of plastic surgery. Plastic surgical training includes advanced knowledge of specific cosmetic plastic surgery techniques.

Among dental practitioners, oral surgeons are the most highly trained. Oral surgeons, following college, undertake a four-year course of dental study limited to oral health, followed by another four-years of study in dental surgery. This training does not lead to a medical degree; it is considered advanced training in dentistry. It is ASAPS' position that dentists and oral surgeons, who are not medical doctors, should perform procedures limited to treating or correcting dental conditions. Any diagnosis or treatment of a condition of the skin, eyelids, eyes or ears is clearly beyond the scope of dental practice. On the other hand, treatment of fractures involving the jaws, which can result in bite abnormalities, falls within the scope of training of an oral surgeon.

“Oral surgeons have trauma experience and are qualified to treat jaw-related injuries,” says Dr. Fodor. “Plastic surgeons have the medical and surgical training to remold, reshape, and remodel the body, head to toe. In many ways, plastic surgeons are more than well-trained doctors and surgeons -- they also are artists of the human body.”

As part of its continuing patient safety initiative, ASAPS urges:

Adoption of enforceable standards for physician education and training to perform cosmetic surgery, based on American Board of Medical Specialties board certification in a specialty appropriate to the specific procedures being performed -- for example, certification by the American Board of Plastic Surgery indicates a surgeon's training in reconstructive and cosmetic plastic surgery of the face and the entire body;


Prohibition of the performance by dentists of cosmetic procedures that are clearly medical in nature and not within the scope of dental practice;


Prohibition of advertising that represents a threat to patient safety by misrepresenting a practitioner's training and credentials.


The 2200-member American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) is the only plastic surgery organization devoted entirely to the advancement of cosmetic surgery. ASAPS is recognized throughout the world as the authoritative source for cosmetic surgery education. U.S. members are certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery. Canadian members are certified in plastic surgery by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.
Toll-free referral line: 888.ASAPS.11 (272.7711). Web site: www.surgery.org



 

ASPS Study Indicates Breast Reduction Diminishes Breast Cancer in High-Risk Women

ASPS Study Indicates Breast Reduction Diminishes Breast Cancer in High-Risk Women
Women With Breast Cancer Family History May Have Alternative Preventative Measure with Breast Reduction
For Immediate Release: May 29, 2004

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. – Women at high risk of developing breast cancer may have an additional preventative alternative to having their breasts removed – breast reduction surgery, according to a study published in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
Although the complete removal of a woman’s breasts can diminish the chance of developing this potentially fatal disease, most women find it extremely difficult to elect to remove their breasts. Women may now have an additional preventative option, based on this report, to have their breasts reduced rather than removed. This represents a real alternative for someone who is a candidate for breast reduction, even though the amount of tissue removed may be small.

“Breast reduction is a risk reducer, not a preventative guarantee,” said Leroy Young, MD, author of the study and chair of ASPS Emerging Trends Committee. “For the majority of women with a high inherited susceptibility to breast cancer, completely removing their breasts is not a desirable option as primary prevention. This study strongly indicates that women, who are breast reduction candidates, can choose to have their breasts reduced instead, thus decreasing their chance of developing breast cancer.”

The report is based on six observational studies conducted in the United States, Canada, Denmark and Sweden. Collectively, the studies examined more than 32,000 women. It found that breast reduction lowered the chance of developing breast cancer 50 to 70 percent. Currently, clinical studies of high-risk women who elect to have their breasts completely removed, known as a prophylactic bilateral mastectomy, demonstrate that patients have lowered their risk by 90 percent. Because some residual breast tissue remains even after a total mastectomy, a 100 percent reduction in risk is not possible by mastectomy alone. These studies and patients in additional studies will continue.

An estimated 215,999 new invasive cases of breast cancer are expected to occur in 2004 among women in the United States, according to the American Cancer Society. This year, more than 40,000 women are expected to die from breast cancer.

“It’s important that women understand their options. Having breast reduction surgery is better than what many high-risk women have done in the past because they did not want to lose their breasts – nothing,” stated Dr. Young. “Educating women about breast reduction, which is often more acceptable than prophylactic mastectomy, could increase the number of women who elect risk-reduction surgery as a preventative measure, which could lead to an overall reduction in breast cancer mortality rates among high-risk women.”

“While this report is based on observational studies, it’s pretty clear that breast reduction could hold a key to decreasing breast cancer in high-risk patients. Undoubtedly, as we reduce the amount of breast tissue, we also reduce the risk of developing breast cancer,” continued Dr. Young. “Going forward, we expect clinical studies will support our findings that breast reduction is a viable preventative alternative for many women.”

More than 113,000 women had breast reduction surgery in 2003, according to ASPS statistics. Breast reconstruction was performed on more than 68,000 women in 2003, according to ASPS statistics.

For referrals to plastic surgeons certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and to learn more about cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery, call ASPS at 888-4-PLASTIC (888-475-2784) or visit www.plasticsurgery.org.

ASPS is the largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons in the world and the foremost authority on cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. With nearly 5,000 members, more than any other plastic surgery organization, ASPS is the definitive voice of the plastic surgery specialty. Viewed throughout the world as the pinnacle of information for new techniques, advances and plastic surgery trends, the society represents 94 percent of all the board-certified plastic surgeons in the U.S. Ninety-four percent of all ASPS members perform cosmetic plastic surgery and 89 percent of all ASPS members perform reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS, founded in 1931, represents physicians certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

CONTACT:
Media Relations
(847) 228-9900
media@plasticsurgery.org
REPORTERS:
Journalists can register with the ASPS for the latest plastic surgery news, information and mailings.


 

Physicians Campaign to Block Dental Surgeons from Performing Plastic Surgery

Physicians Campaign to Block Dental Surgeons from Performing Plastic Surgery
SB 1336 would allow dental surgeons to pay $150 fee to perform delicate procedures
For Immediate Release: May 27, 2004

SACRAMENTO – A coalition of medical physicians today announced a major campaign to block passage of proposed legislation that would allow dental surgeons to perform plastic surgery on patients in California. SB 1336 would license dental surgeons to perform facelifts, eyelid surgery, nose jobs and other delicate procedures after paying a $150 fee to the California Board of Dental Examiners.
“This legislation would be absolutely ridiculous if it weren’t so dangerous,” said Dr. Harvey A Zarem, president of the California Society of Plastic Surgeons. “With the $150 fee to the California Board of Dental Examiners, you cannot buy the experience and breadth of training acquired by board-certified plastic surgeons. We need to be looking for ways to make plastic surgery more safe, not less safe. Politicians should not substitute legislation for education.”

A key reason for the coalition’s opposition to SB 1336 is the large gap in training between board-certified plastic surgeons and dental surgeons (DDS/DMDs), who are not medical doctors (MDs). The education of plastic surgeons includes four years of medical school, two years of which are devoted to patient diagnosis and management. They spend another seven or eight years in residency programs, practicing plastic surgery under the guidance of experienced physicians.

In contrast, dental surgeons study general dentistry for four years and dental surgery for another four years. Only 18 months of the final four-year period is spent in residency programs practicing dental surgery.

“I have nothing against dental surgeons,” Dr. Zarem said. “But I would not send my wife or children to a plastic surgeon to have their wisdom teeth pulled. And I certainly would not have them go to a dental surgeon for a facelift.”

The Coalition for Safe Plastic Surgery said it is mobilizing doctors and patients throughout California to oppose SB 1336. Coalition members include the California Society of Plastic Surgeons (CSPS), California Medical Association (CMA), American College of Emergency Physicians – State Chapter of California, Inc., American College of Surgeons, American Society of Plastic Surgeons, American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons, American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, American Academy of Ophthalmology, Sierra-Sacramento Valley Medical Society, Santa Barbara County Medical Society, and the Marin Medical Society.

“Some California dental surgeons are putting profit ahead of patient safety,” said Robert E. Hertzka, MD, president of the CMA. “This is bad medicine. There is no public policy or health access issue here. This is about money and it is unfortunate that dental surgeons are willing to risk the health and safety of their patients to get it.”

The Coalition for Safe Plastic Surgery is stepping up the campaign against SB 1336 during the CSPS’ annual meeting in San Diego May 27 through May 30. In addition to mobilizing plastic surgeons against the proposed legislation, the group will distribute posters and postcards for physicians to distribute to their fellow medical doctors and patients.

Top plastic surgeons, CMA officials and other campaign spokespersons will be available to discuss the campaign with reporters at 11 a.m. on Thursday, May 27. Contact Tupper Hull (916-451-9200) or Tom Wolf (312-573-5472) for additional information.

SB 1336, sponsored by Sen. John Burton, is scheduled to be heard in the Assembly Business & Professions Committee June 8.




 

Latest Science and Techniques; Plastic Surgery Societies 'Take Charge of Aging'
For Immediate Release: May 14, 2004

New York, NY (May 14, 2004) — Newest advances in anti-aging medicine; genetic theories and the demographics of aging; hormonal therapy; and the role of optimized nutrition are among the aspects of age management to be featured in the symposium Rejuvenation Medicine: Take Charge of Aging, May 21-23 at New York’s Hilton Hotel. Rejuvenation Medicine: Take Charge of Aging is being jointly presented by the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) and the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
“It’s easy to dismiss anti-aging research as ‘fringe’ or unsupported by solid science,” says ASPS President Rod Rohrich, MD. “And no doubt many things that sound exciting today may not even be on the radar tomorrow. In order to best serve their patients, however, plastic surgeons need to follow the ongoing research in this field.”

In his presentation, Symposium Program Chair Brian Kinney, MD, will explore the newest advances in rejuvenation science, stressing the reduction of health-risk factors in what he prefers to call “quality of life medicine.” As Dr. Kinney explains it, “Anti-aging is ‘for real.’ We can’t stop the aging process, but we can definitely slow it down.”

Highlights of the symposium include:



Newest Advances in Anti-aging Medicine. What works, what might work, and what doesn’t work. [Brian Kinney, MD]
How to Evaluate and Care for Your Patient’s Skin: Intensive Peels and Postoperative Therapy, Phenol and TCA. [Jeffrey Kenkel, MD]
Botox and Perioperative Techniques. The role of nonsurgical facial rejuvenation techniques in cosmetic surgery. Fillers/injectables, ablative and non-ablative laser technology. [Alan Matarasso, MD]
Lasers, Pulsed Light and Peels. Which one and when? [Barry DiBernardo, MD]
Ongoing Results With the Erbium Laser & a CO2 Retrospective. [Lawrence Bass, MD]
Thermage and Maintenance Therapy of the Skin. [Charles Hughes, MD]
Testosterone and Adrenal Androgens in Men; Estrogen and Progesterone Replacement in Women. [Julio Garcia, MD]
By 2025, 25 percent of Americans will be older than 65, and individuals older than 85 are the most rapidly growing segment of the population. Symposium Program Co-Chair James Carraway, MD, points out, “Plastic surgeons are interested not only in helping patients look better, but also helping them feel better.”

ASAPS President Peter Fodor, MD, agrees: “ASAPS is dedicated to expanding plastic surgeons’ knowledge about all aspects of rejuvenation science, and we are pleased to be joining forces with ASPS in this effort to separate the valid from the ‘junk’ science that is currently available. Nonsurgical interventions are not meant to take the place of aesthetic surgery,” he continues, “but they complement and enhance an overall strategy for improving patients’ quality of life.”

All presenters are available for interviews. Contact Adeena Colbert or Heather Mantione at 212.921.0500.

The 2,200 member American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) is the only plastic surgery organization devoted entirely to the advancement of cosmetic surgery. ASAPS is recognized throughout the world as the authoritative source for cosmetic surgery education. Web site: www.surgery.org. With nearly 5,000 members, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) is the largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons in the world. Web site: www.plasticsurgery.org. Members of both ASAPS and ASPS are certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery or the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. ASAPS and ASPS jointly sponsor symposia on cosmetic plastic surgery topics each year as part of each organization’s mission to support its members through continuing education.




Saturday, May 29, 2004  

"Tall, white" Bolivian beauty in troubleGabriela Oviedo, from Bolivia, described herself as tall and white in contrast to the shorter, Indian nature of many of her countrymen. She is facing calls to resign from the Miss Universe contest.




Friday, May 28, 2004  

The New York Times > Arts > Music > The Curse of Beauty for Serious Musicians An interesting article about beautiful women who are also serious classical musicians focussing on violinist Lara St. John and her new album release: "Re: Bach".



 

CBS News | Beauty Counts - Even For Lobsters | May 27, 2004?06:57:31


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