A GOOD SELECTION OF BOOKS ON BEAUTY IN CULTURE FROM WWW.AMAZON.COM
Hope in a Jar
Looking Good : Male Body Image in Modern America
Fat History : Bodies and Beauty in the Modern West
The Evolution of Desire : Strategies of Human Mating
Hope in a Jar: The Making of America's Beauty Culture
Looking Good : Male Body Image in Modern America
Fat History : Bodies and Beauty in the Modern West
The Evolution of Desire : Strategies of Human Mating

Beauty products have withstood the slings and arrows of more than 100 years of public debate, charged with being guilty of everything from immorality to self-indulgence to anti-feminism. A welcome new angle on the subject of our culture's obsession with personal appearance, Hope in a Jar reveals that the American beauty industry was founded on more than just clever advertising or patriarchal oppression.

 

An interesting book on the world of "male vanity" situating the problem within consumer capitalism of the late twentieth century and referring to the changing nature of the male role.

 

Do you want to know about the meaning of "fat" in Western culture? This book contrasts attitudes to it in America and France with special emphasis on the 'morality' of dieting.

This is an interesting, well-written and convincing book. Using the theory of evolutionary psychology as well as studies of 10,000 people across 37 cultures it illustrates the different sexual strategies which men and women pursue.

 
The Adonis Complex : The Secret Crisis of Male Body Obsession The Male Body : A New Look at Men in Public and in Private
Aching for Beauty: Footbinding in China
The Mating Mind : How Sexual Choice Shaped the Evolution of Human Nature
The Adonis Complex : The Secret Crisis of Male Body Obsession
The Male Body : A New Look at Men in Public and in Private
Aching for Beauty: Footbinding in China
The Mating Mind: How Sexual Choice Shaped the Evolution of Human Nature

You see them everywhere. With their bulging arms and deltoids and pecs, not to mention their rippling abdominal muscles, they appear on magazine covers, in underwear ads, in action movies. And American men have noticed them; after a generation of being bombarded by images of idealized male physiques, men are growing increasingly insecure about their own appearance.



In The Male Body, Susan Bordo (who snagged a Pulitzer nomination for 1993's Unbearable Weight) offers a frank, sprightly, and, yes, educational look at the male nude as an index to attitudes about sexuality in the broth of media and pop culture in which, like it or not, we all stew. While the Greeks were unafraid to celebrate masculine beauty, men have been strangely sexless throughout most of Western history--until Hollywood rediscovered the male body when Marlon Brando first shed his T-shirt in A Streetcar Named Desire. It's only been in the '90s, however, that the male image has gone so far as to reclaim its penis. From de facto censorship to near idolatry, has ever an organ made such a journey in one brief decade? But it's not the penis alone that makes a man a man; perhaps, Bordo concludes, it's time for us to rethink our metaphors of manhood.

 

Why did so many Chinese women over a thousand-year period bind their feet, enduring rotting flesh, throbbing pain, and hampered mobility throughout their lives? What compelled mothers to bind the feet of their young daughters, forcing the girls to walk about on their doubled-over limbs to achieve the breakage of bones requisite for three-inch feet? Why did Chinese men find women's "golden lotuses"-stench and all-so arousing, inspiring beauty contests for feet, thousands of poems, and erotica in which bound, silk-slippered feet were fetishized and lusted after?

 

Evolutionary psychology has been called the "new black" of science fashion, though at its most controversial, it more resembles the emperor's new clothes. Geoffrey Miller is one of the Young Turks trying to give the phenomenon a better spin. In The Mating Mind, he takes Darwin's "other" evolutionary theory--of sexual rather than natural selection--and uses it to build a theory about how the human mind has developed the sophistication of a peacock's tail to encourage sexual choice and the refining of art, morality, music, and literature.

 
Unbearable Weight : Feminism, Western Culture and the Body
Evolutionary Principles of Human Adolescence
Blonde Like Me: The Roots of the Blonde Myth In Our Culture
Unbearable Weight : Feminism, Western Culture and the Body
Evolutionary Principles of Human Adolescence
Blonde Like Me: The Roots of the Blonde Myth In Our Culture
The Beauty Myth: How Images of Beauty Are Used Against Women

In this provocative book, Susan Bordo untangles the myths, ideologies, and pathologies of the modern female body. Bordo explores our tortured fascination with food, hunger, desire, and control, and its effects on women's lives.

 

This is an exploration of adolescent development from an evolutionary perspective but with considerable attention being paid to the development of the adolescent physique and its attractiveness to the opposite sex.

In this irreverent, unsparing, and witty look at our cultural obsession with blonde, Natalia Ilyin shows us that our apparently modern fixation has truly primeval roots. Highlighting cultural criticism with personal experience, she cites ancient myths, Hollywood iconography, and the daily assault of advertising to reveal why the allure of being a blonde has crossed the boundaries of ethnicity, economics, and age. In essence, she shows us the difference between simply having blonde hair and being a blonde.


In a country where the average woman is 5-foot-4 and weighs 140 pounds, movies, advertisements, and MTV saturate our lives with unrealistic images of beauty. The tall, nearly emaciated mannequins that push the latest miracle cosmetic make even the most confident woman question her appearance. Feminist Naomi Wolf argues that women's insecurities are heightened by these images, then exploited by the diet, cosmetic, and plastic surgery industries. Every day new products are introduced to "correct" inherently female "flaws," drawing women into an obsessive and hopeless cycle built around the attempt to reach an impossible standard of beauty. Wolf rejects the standard and embraces the naturally distinct beauty of all women.

beautyworlds.com also recommends the following books from www.amazon.com

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